South Australia’s New Vehicle Number Plates

By Melbourne, Australia correspondent Angelina Dawn Summers-Winter

Application of the latest technology in vehicle number plates is to see first light in South Australia starting from the 14th of November, 2017.

Unlike previous embossed number plates, these ones will be made from a composite laminate incorporating a luminous layer, removing the need to have the number plate illuminated at night. The technology for laminating the luminous layer is proprietary and number plates using the TritiumFilm™ technology will initially be manufactured in Japan by a small startup company operating in the Fukushima Prefecture, extracting the vital Tritium from sea water using the now-obsolete ALPS plant at the disused reactor site.

Another enhancement is to employ the German DIN-1451, falsification-resistant font for the vehicle registration number, making it nearly impossible to alter the plate to try to frustrate South Australia’s number plate recognition systems to be installed in increasing numbers, starting before the Christmas break. Point-to-point speed cameras are playing an increased role in the State’s budget; but drivers must simply obey the rules if they wish to avoid the higher fines for next year; to be detailed next month..

SA-Darkness

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Australia Seeks Chief Engineer

By Canberra, Australia correspondent Erica Quarterbee

A draft advertisement for the position of Chief Engineer is circulating through the corridors of power in Canberra.

Bureau of the Chief Engineer AustraliaThe Chief Engineer is to run an independent Bureau to advise on policies relating to technologies and to audit spending on infrastructure and deployment of technologies within all of government. The Bureau of the Chief Engineer will operate as an independent, professional, “corporate consultancy and inspectorate” to the Prime Minister and Cabinet.

Australia has lacked a Science Minister since the installation of the current government. It’s understood that the Prime Minister’s Office wants to install a permanent mechanism by employing independent professionals who are able to interpret the science and technology for relevance and effectiveness.

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Germany Bans Accidents at Black Spots

by Fürth, Germany correspondent Stefan Sichermann (Der Postillon)
Translated by Vasili Dbrznvkovitz

Unfallverbot

After sitting on their hands for 5 years, the Transport Ministry, under the fresh leadership of Alexander Dobrindt has bitten the bullet and will finally introduce these signs at accident black spots starting this summer.

“Our researchers found”, noted Dobrindt, “that road fatalities have one common factor: An accident. So prohibiting accidents, by means of these signs, will dramatically reduce the carnage on the roads.”

Alas, their financial resources for traffic infrastructure are woefully inadequate so the Minister has decided to first deploy these signs at accident black spots for maximum effect.

The Minister sees that the erection of the signs on all roads will eventually make obsolete other road signs like speed limit, one-way street, no overtaking, and other warning signs about e.g. incomplete bridges; saving a taxpayers a lot of money spent maintaining the vocabulary of road signs deployed in Germany.